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Thread: (UK EURO THREAD) UK POLITICS MK2

  1. #14321
    Keckers's Avatar
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    After brexit is done it might be difficult to find anyone admitting they ever voted tory.
    Look, the wages you withheld from the workmen who mowed your fields are crying out against you. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of Hosts. You have lived on earth in luxury and self-indulgence. You have fattened yourselves for slaughter.

  2. #14322
    DerWish's Avatar
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    UK Parliament voting the cut his own balls, precious Breshit moments.
    BoJo will sign the deal with the US, Parliament won't get a say in it and cannot read it as it's made secret for 5 years.

    How's that gonna work, I don't fucking know, but Tory's logic.
    Last edited by DerWish; July 22 2020 at 06:43:26 AM.

  3. #14323

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keckers View Post
    After brexit is done it might be difficult to find anyone admitting they ever voted tory.
    You were hard-pressed to get anyone to admit to voting Tory during the 1980s.

    Yet they somehow managed to hang on to power until 1997.

  4. #14324
    Malcanis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerWish View Post
    UK Parliament voting the cut his own balls, precious Breshit moments.
    BoJo will sign the deal with the UK, Parliament won't get a say in it and cannot read it as it's made secret for 5 years.

    How's that gonna work, I don't fucking know, but Tory's logic.
    ~ D E M O C R A C Y ~
    Quote Originally Posted by Isyel View Post
    And btw, you're such a fucking asshole it genuinely amazes me on a regular basis how you manage to function.

  5. #14325
    DerWish's Avatar
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    Just a couple of small Breshit news...

    No UK-US trade deal this year, UK blaming the corona virus for it.
    No UK-EU trade deal this year, UK blaming the EU for it.

    UK failed to change the percentage in the origin rules, which means, none of the car finished in UK has the right to say it is made in UK... meaning not even in case of a free trade deal a car exported from the UK would be tariff free anywhere.

    UK CA, which would replace CE marking, will be in effect after 1st Jan.
    What are the UK CA manufacturing standards, you ask? Nothing is known about it.
    Mrs May originally wanted to copy the CE for UK, but Bojo decided UK needs their own, which is 100% percent okay... you just need to fucking define what it is in time!

    I had worked in a major IT manufacturing company's major project about the EU standards and hazardous materials in manufactured goods (like cobalt and other crazy dangerous stuff in servers) and it's not a one day to another kind a change in the manufacturing setup.

    All manufacturers made their plans with the promise from May's government: the UK will continue with the CE scheme, as it is gold standard now days... btw it is a gold standard due to long years of fine tuning, in which the UK had huge part of shaping.
    I really fucking don't know what UK wants to do now.

  6. #14326
    Movember 2012 Stoffl's Avatar
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    Keep calm*and and shamble on



    *not really

    MI8m8

  7. #14327

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    Also if EU has 30 pages of things that are changing in any case with UK trade the list of changes happening in all scenarios for UK will be tad longer as relations with pretty much every country will change...

    But the race to the bottom is still pretty much tied with UK and USA

  8. #14328
    Malcanis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerWish View Post
    Just a couple of small Breshit news...

    No UK-US trade deal this year, UK blaming the corona virus for it.
    No UK-EU trade deal this year, UK blaming the EU for it.

    UK failed to change the percentage in the origin rules, which means, none of the car finished in UK has the right to say it is made in UK... meaning not even in case of a free trade deal a car exported from the UK would be tariff free anywhere.

    UK CA, which would replace CE marking, will be in effect after 1st Jan.
    What are the UK CA manufacturing standards, you ask? Nothing is known about it.
    Mrs May originally wanted to copy the CE for UK, but Bojo decided UK needs their own, which is 100% percent okay... you just need to fucking define what it is in time!

    I had worked in a major IT manufacturing company's major project about the EU standards and hazardous materials in manufactured goods (like cobalt and other crazy dangerous stuff in servers) and it's not a one day to another kind a change in the manufacturing setup.

    All manufacturers made their plans with the promise from May's government: the UK will continue with the CE scheme, as it is gold standard now days... btw it is a gold standard due to long years of fine tuning, in which the UK had huge part of shaping.
    I really fucking don't know what UK wants to do now.
    Pfeffel in "Lazymode making this shit up because he assumes he's too awesome to ever get anything actually wrong" non-shocker
    Quote Originally Posted by Isyel View Post
    And btw, you're such a fucking asshole it genuinely amazes me on a regular basis how you manage to function.

  9. #14329
    Movember 2012 Zekk Pacus's Avatar
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    'I'm pro life. I'm a non-smoker. I'm a pro-life non-smoker. WOO, Let the party begin!'

  10. #14330

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    Quote Originally Posted by DerWish View Post

    All manufacturers made their plans with the promise from May's government: the UK will continue with the CE scheme, as it is gold standard now days... btw it is a gold standard due to long years of fine tuning, in which the UK had huge part of shaping.
    I really fucking don't know what UK wants to do now.
    Well the answer seems clear to me: Take the CE standard, then ask around who wants to give you money to water it down. Despicable, yes, and short-sighted... but practicable.

  11. #14331

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zekk Pacus View Post
    He's going to have his flight home diverted to Barnard's Castle International Airport, thus avoiding the need for quarantine.

  12. #14332
    GeromeDoutrande's Avatar
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    The hard Brexit choices that could yet deliver a deal
    Disagreements between EU and UK are lessening despite frustrating series of talks
    https://www.ft.com/content/ae1805a0-...6-c5b63a4731a2

    The EU-UK future-relationship talks remain deadlocked on two main sticking points — fishing rights and state subsidies — with no immediate solutions in sight despite Michel Barnier and David Frost meeting for further discussions this week. Mr Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, warned last week that “the time for answers is quickly running out”, but both sides have signalled that the range of disagreements is narrowing, potentially clearing the way for a deal in September or at the very latest October — albeit one that will introduce new costs and frictions for business. At an internal briefing with EU diplomats on Friday, Mr Barnier said the UK had scaled back some of its aspirations in the trade talks and was now seeking what amounted to a “low-quality, low-profile” agreement, but one that would still provide tariff-and-quota-free access to the EU market. Officials on both sides say compromises are there to be struck. Much will depend on the political will on both sides to make hard choices in a handful of key areas.

    State aid and the level playing field
    This was one of the areas where no decisive progress was made in July. The EU is adamant that it will not allow the UK “zero tariff, zero quota” access to the EU single market unless it signs up to a set of “level playing field” principles that minimise the risk of Britain undercutting the EU on environmental regulation, workers rights and state aid to business. Brussels has signalled a willingness to drop its demand that the UK accepts future EU state-aid rules and the oversight of the European Court of Justice (ECJ), but in exchange it wants the UK to sign up to a “shared philosophy” on future subsidy policy. Britain argues that an independent dispute resolution system should be sufficient to give confidence to both sides, but has thus far refused to tell Brussels what the UK’s new subsidy regime will look like.*Mr Barnier told EU diplomats on Friday that the level playing field was the most difficult subject in the entire-future relationship negotiation. Closing the gap here will be critical to any deal.

    Governance of the agreement
    Brussels has consistently called for an overarching “strategic partnership” with the ability to seek redress by imposing cross-cutting sanctions. Britain prefers an array of separate agreements that do not allow transgressions in one sector to be punished by sanctions in another. Mr Frost confirmed last week that the UK was willing to look at “simpler structures” for overseeing and enforcing any deal compared to its initial proposals. This was confirmed by EU officials, who said nonetheless that Britain still wanted standalone agreements on aviation, fish, and civil-nuclear co-operation. While further work is needed, a middle ground is clearly emerging.

    Criminal justice co-operation and data sharing
    Mr Barnier confirmed to diplomats on Friday that positions are converging on future police and judicial co-operation. Talks have been eased by the EU’s willingness to explore options for keeping the ECJ out of the future EU-UK relationship — a core British red line. This will restrict the depth of future co-operation. Britain is already resigned to losing access to some EU crime-fighting databases, including the Schengen Information System (SIS II). For non-law enforcement data sharing, the UK is seeking a so-called adequacy decision from the European Commission. This will be unilateral and vulnerable to legal challenges, as an ECJ decision this month striking down the US-EU Privacy Shield data sharing agreement demonstrated. One solution is to agree a contingency process that will help maintain data flows in the event of no agreement.

    Freight transport
    Britain wants an ambitious facilitation agreement to smooth the flows of the “roll-on, roll-off” freight system that sees up to 10,000 lorries a day flowing through Dover and the Channel tunnel. It is also seeking a deal that would see both sides recognising the other’s truck permits. Both sides have an interest in agreeing this deal, but the EU is clear that it must be linked to agreement on the “level playing field” and maintaining minimum environmental, social and labour standards, so that haulage companies cannot set up in the UK and undercut their EU counterparts and standards.

    Rules of origin
    Britain wants so-called “cross cumulation” that would enable it to count industrial inputs (components, raw materials or ingredients) from non-EU countries as “British” when assessing whether a product is sufficiently “UK-made” to qualify for tariff-free access to the EU single market. This would apply for inputs from countries with which the EU and UK both had trade deals. The EU says it will not agree to this because of the risk that Britain would become an “assembly hub” on the bloc’s perimeter. Possible solutions could include time-limiting a period of cross cumulation where inputs from, say EU trade partners such as Canada, Japan or South Korea, could still continue to count as British for an adjustment period. Another alternative would be for the UK to join the pan-Euro-Mediterranean convention that allows cumulation with about 20 countries, including Turkey and Israel.

    Mutual recognition
    Britain began the negotiations seeking close to automatic mutual recognition of professional qualifications, as well as powers for UK inspection organisations to certify goods as conforming to EU standards in order that they could be exported to the European market. The EU took a firm line against these UK requests, explicitly ruling out allowing Britain to become a “certification hub” after having given up its EU membership. But people close to the talks confirm that the UK has now moderated its ambitions: Mr Barnier told EU diplomats on Friday that Britain had abandoned attempts at “cherry picking” several benefits of the EU single market, adopting more realistic positions on issues such as market-access rights for UK lawyers and recognition of qualifications.

    Financial services
    The negotiation on financial services is taking place outside the talks on the EU-UK future relationship since Brussels has insisted that market access will depend not on a mutual agreement, but on a unilateral assessment by the EU of whether UK regulations are as tough as its own. A deadline for assessments to be completed by June 30 has been missed and Mr Barnier has rejected attempts by Britain to find ways to lock in access rights for the long term.*Brussels said in a policy paper this month that some of the most sensitive market access rights, for example for investment firms, would not be available in the near future because the EU’s own rules are in flux.*There is little the UK can do about this, meaning that the almost inevitable landing zone is an incomplete patchwork of rights that firms will have to work with and around.

    Fishing rights
    This is a highly politically sensitive area for both sides, even though fishing accounts for less than 1 per cent of EU gross domestic product and 0.1 per cent of UK GDP. The EU entered the negotiations seeking continued “status quo” access for its fishing boats to British waters and to retain as many catching rights as possible; Britain wants significant new quotas for UK fishermen.*Despite all the political sensitivities, both sides see scope for a compromise on fish. This will almost certainly come only in the end-game of talks, when Britain will try to leverage the issue to secure compromises on the level playing field. A deal on fish will require the EU to cede quotas to Britain, but in a phased manner that gives medium-term certainty for the EU’s fishing fleet. For the time being, the two sides remain far apart.

  13. #14333
    Duckslayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keckers View Post
    After brexit is done it might be difficult to find anyone admitting they ever voted tory.
    Except Teds

  14. #14334
    Movember 2012 Elriche Oshego's Avatar
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    'ate Tories
    luv Seatbelts

  15. #14335

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeromeDoutrande View Post
    The hard Brexit choices that could yet deliver a deal
    Disagreements between EU and UK are lessening despite frustrating series of talks
    https://www.ft.com/content/ae1805a0-...6-c5b63a4731a2

    The EU-UK future-relationship talks remain deadlocked on two main sticking points — fishing rights and state subsidies — with no immediate solutions in sight despite Michel Barnier and David Frost meeting for further discussions this week. Mr Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, warned last week that “the time for answers is quickly running out”, but both sides have signalled that the range of disagreements is narrowing, potentially clearing the way for a deal in September or at the very latest October — albeit one that will introduce new costs and frictions for business. At an internal briefing with EU diplomats on Friday, Mr Barnier said the UK had scaled back some of its aspirations in the trade talks and was now seeking what amounted to a “low-quality, low-profile” agreement, but one that would still provide tariff-and-quota-free access to the EU market. Officials on both sides say compromises are there to be struck. Much will depend on the political will on both sides to make hard choices in a handful of key areas.

    State aid and the level playing field
    This was one of the areas where no decisive progress was made in July. The EU is adamant that it will not allow the UK “zero tariff, zero quota” access to the EU single market unless it signs up to a set of “level playing field” principles that minimise the risk of Britain undercutting the EU on environmental regulation, workers rights and state aid to business. Brussels has signalled a willingness to drop its demand that the UK accepts future EU state-aid rules and the oversight of the European Court of Justice (ECJ), but in exchange it wants the UK to sign up to a “shared philosophy” on future subsidy policy. Britain argues that an independent dispute resolution system should be sufficient to give confidence to both sides, but has thus far refused to tell Brussels what the UK’s new subsidy regime will look like.*Mr Barnier told EU diplomats on Friday that the level playing field was the most difficult subject in the entire-future relationship negotiation. Closing the gap here will be critical to any deal.

    Governance of the agreement
    Brussels has consistently called for an overarching “strategic partnership” with the ability to seek redress by imposing cross-cutting sanctions. Britain prefers an array of separate agreements that do not allow transgressions in one sector to be punished by sanctions in another. Mr Frost confirmed last week that the UK was willing to look at “simpler structures” for overseeing and enforcing any deal compared to its initial proposals. This was confirmed by EU officials, who said nonetheless that Britain still wanted standalone agreements on aviation, fish, and civil-nuclear co-operation. While further work is needed, a middle ground is clearly emerging.

    Criminal justice co-operation and data sharing
    Mr Barnier confirmed to diplomats on Friday that positions are converging on future police and judicial co-operation. Talks have been eased by the EU’s willingness to explore options for keeping the ECJ out of the future EU-UK relationship — a core British red line. This will restrict the depth of future co-operation. Britain is already resigned to losing access to some EU crime-fighting databases, including the Schengen Information System (SIS II). For non-law enforcement data sharing, the UK is seeking a so-called adequacy decision from the European Commission. This will be unilateral and vulnerable to legal challenges, as an ECJ decision this month striking down the US-EU Privacy Shield data sharing agreement demonstrated. One solution is to agree a contingency process that will help maintain data flows in the event of no agreement.

    Freight transport
    Britain wants an ambitious facilitation agreement to smooth the flows of the “roll-on, roll-off” freight system that sees up to 10,000 lorries a day flowing through Dover and the Channel tunnel. It is also seeking a deal that would see both sides recognising the other’s truck permits. Both sides have an interest in agreeing this deal, but the EU is clear that it must be linked to agreement on the “level playing field” and maintaining minimum environmental, social and labour standards, so that haulage companies cannot set up in the UK and undercut their EU counterparts and standards.

    Rules of origin
    Britain wants so-called “cross cumulation” that would enable it to count industrial inputs (components, raw materials or ingredients) from non-EU countries as “British” when assessing whether a product is sufficiently “UK-made” to qualify for tariff-free access to the EU single market. This would apply for inputs from countries with which the EU and UK both had trade deals. The EU says it will not agree to this because of the risk that Britain would become an “assembly hub” on the bloc’s perimeter. Possible solutions could include time-limiting a period of cross cumulation where inputs from, say EU trade partners such as Canada, Japan or South Korea, could still continue to count as British for an adjustment period. Another alternative would be for the UK to join the pan-Euro-Mediterranean convention that allows cumulation with about 20 countries, including Turkey and Israel.

    Mutual recognition
    Britain began the negotiations seeking close to automatic mutual recognition of professional qualifications, as well as powers for UK inspection organisations to certify goods as conforming to EU standards in order that they could be exported to the European market. The EU took a firm line against these UK requests, explicitly ruling out allowing Britain to become a “certification hub” after having given up its EU membership. But people close to the talks confirm that the UK has now moderated its ambitions: Mr Barnier told EU diplomats on Friday that Britain had abandoned attempts at “cherry picking” several benefits of the EU single market, adopting more realistic positions on issues such as market-access rights for UK lawyers and recognition of qualifications.

    Financial services
    The negotiation on financial services is taking place outside the talks on the EU-UK future relationship since Brussels has insisted that market access will depend not on a mutual agreement, but on a unilateral assessment by the EU of whether UK regulations are as tough as its own. A deadline for assessments to be completed by June 30 has been missed and Mr Barnier has rejected attempts by Britain to find ways to lock in access rights for the long term.*Brussels said in a policy paper this month that some of the most sensitive market access rights, for example for investment firms, would not be available in the near future because the EU’s own rules are in flux.*There is little the UK can do about this, meaning that the almost inevitable landing zone is an incomplete patchwork of rights that firms will have to work with and around.

    Fishing rights
    This is a highly politically sensitive area for both sides, even though fishing accounts for less than 1 per cent of EU gross domestic product and 0.1 per cent of UK GDP. The EU entered the negotiations seeking continued “status quo” access for its fishing boats to British waters and to retain as many catching rights as possible; Britain wants significant new quotas for UK fishermen.*Despite all the political sensitivities, both sides see scope for a compromise on fish. This will almost certainly come only in the end-game of talks, when Britain will try to leverage the issue to secure compromises on the level playing field. A deal on fish will require the EU to cede quotas to Britain, but in a phased manner that gives medium-term certainty for the EU’s fishing fleet. For the time being, the two sides remain far apart.
    Sweet JEsus this is actually going worse than I ever imagined. I kind of hope it fucks up some of my friends lives who voted for this shit show.

  16. #14336
    Donor erichkknaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeromeDoutrande View Post
    The hard Brexit choices that could yet deliver a deal
    Disagreements between EU and UK are lessening despite frustrating series of talks
    https://www.ft.com/content/ae1805a0-...6-c5b63a4731a2

    The EU-UK future-relationship talks remain deadlocked on two main sticking points — fishing rights and state subsidies — with no immediate solutions in sight despite Michel Barnier and David Frost meeting for further discussions this week. Mr Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, warned last week that “the time for answers is quickly running out”, but both sides have signalled that the range of disagreements is narrowing, potentially clearing the way for a deal in September or at the very latest October — albeit one that will introduce new costs and frictions for business. At an internal briefing with EU diplomats on Friday, Mr Barnier said the UK had scaled back some of its aspirations in the trade talks and was now seeking what amounted to a “low-quality, low-profile” agreement, but one that would still provide tariff-and-quota-free access to the EU market. Officials on both sides say compromises are there to be struck. Much will depend on the political will on both sides to make hard choices in a handful of key areas.

    State aid and the level playing field
    This was one of the areas where no decisive progress was made in July. The EU is adamant that it will not allow the UK “zero tariff, zero quota” access to the EU single market unless it signs up to a set of “level playing field” principles that minimise the risk of Britain undercutting the EU on environmental regulation, workers rights and state aid to business. Brussels has signalled a willingness to drop its demand that the UK accepts future EU state-aid rules and the oversight of the European Court of Justice (ECJ), but in exchange it wants the UK to sign up to a “shared philosophy” on future subsidy policy. Britain argues that an independent dispute resolution system should be sufficient to give confidence to both sides, but has thus far refused to tell Brussels what the UK’s new subsidy regime will look like.*Mr Barnier told EU diplomats on Friday that the level playing field was the most difficult subject in the entire-future relationship negotiation. Closing the gap here will be critical to any deal.

    Governance of the agreement
    Brussels has consistently called for an overarching “strategic partnership” with the ability to seek redress by imposing cross-cutting sanctions. Britain prefers an array of separate agreements that do not allow transgressions in one sector to be punished by sanctions in another. Mr Frost confirmed last week that the UK was willing to look at “simpler structures” for overseeing and enforcing any deal compared to its initial proposals. This was confirmed by EU officials, who said nonetheless that Britain still wanted standalone agreements on aviation, fish, and civil-nuclear co-operation. While further work is needed, a middle ground is clearly emerging.

    Criminal justice co-operation and data sharing
    Mr Barnier confirmed to diplomats on Friday that positions are converging on future police and judicial co-operation. Talks have been eased by the EU’s willingness to explore options for keeping the ECJ out of the future EU-UK relationship — a core British red line. This will restrict the depth of future co-operation. Britain is already resigned to losing access to some EU crime-fighting databases, including the Schengen Information System (SIS II). For non-law enforcement data sharing, the UK is seeking a so-called adequacy decision from the European Commission. This will be unilateral and vulnerable to legal challenges, as an ECJ decision this month striking down the US-EU Privacy Shield data sharing agreement demonstrated. One solution is to agree a contingency process that will help maintain data flows in the event of no agreement.

    Freight transport
    Britain wants an ambitious facilitation agreement to smooth the flows of the “roll-on, roll-off” freight system that sees up to 10,000 lorries a day flowing through Dover and the Channel tunnel. It is also seeking a deal that would see both sides recognising the other’s truck permits. Both sides have an interest in agreeing this deal, but the EU is clear that it must be linked to agreement on the “level playing field” and maintaining minimum environmental, social and labour standards, so that haulage companies cannot set up in the UK and undercut their EU counterparts and standards.

    Rules of origin
    Britain wants so-called “cross cumulation” that would enable it to count industrial inputs (components, raw materials or ingredients) from non-EU countries as “British” when assessing whether a product is sufficiently “UK-made” to qualify for tariff-free access to the EU single market. This would apply for inputs from countries with which the EU and UK both had trade deals. The EU says it will not agree to this because of the risk that Britain would become an “assembly hub” on the bloc’s perimeter. Possible solutions could include time-limiting a period of cross cumulation where inputs from, say EU trade partners such as Canada, Japan or South Korea, could still continue to count as British for an adjustment period. Another alternative would be for the UK to join the pan-Euro-Mediterranean convention that allows cumulation with about 20 countries, including Turkey and Israel.

    Mutual recognition
    Britain began the negotiations seeking close to automatic mutual recognition of professional qualifications, as well as powers for UK inspection organisations to certify goods as conforming to EU standards in order that they could be exported to the European market. The EU took a firm line against these UK requests, explicitly ruling out allowing Britain to become a “certification hub” after having given up its EU membership. But people close to the talks confirm that the UK has now moderated its ambitions: Mr Barnier told EU diplomats on Friday that Britain had abandoned attempts at “cherry picking” several benefits of the EU single market, adopting more realistic positions on issues such as market-access rights for UK lawyers and recognition of qualifications.

    Financial services
    The negotiation on financial services is taking place outside the talks on the EU-UK future relationship since Brussels has insisted that market access will depend not on a mutual agreement, but on a unilateral assessment by the EU of whether UK regulations are as tough as its own. A deadline for assessments to be completed by June 30 has been missed and Mr Barnier has rejected attempts by Britain to find ways to lock in access rights for the long term.*Brussels said in a policy paper this month that some of the most sensitive market access rights, for example for investment firms, would not be available in the near future because the EU’s own rules are in flux.*There is little the UK can do about this, meaning that the almost inevitable landing zone is an incomplete patchwork of rights that firms will have to work with and around.

    Fishing rights
    This is a highly politically sensitive area for both sides, even though fishing accounts for less than 1 per cent of EU gross domestic product and 0.1 per cent of UK GDP. The EU entered the negotiations seeking continued “status quo” access for its fishing boats to British waters and to retain as many catching rights as possible; Britain wants significant new quotas for UK fishermen.*Despite all the political sensitivities, both sides see scope for a compromise on fish. This will almost certainly come only in the end-game of talks, when Britain will try to leverage the issue to secure compromises on the level playing field. A deal on fish will require the EU to cede quotas to Britain, but in a phased manner that gives medium-term certainty for the EU’s fishing fleet. For the time being, the two sides remain far apart.
    A hard, rough brexit, with some choking, hair pulling and a few teeth-loosening slaps.
    meh

  17. #14337
    Malcanis's Avatar
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    Wow, the Jews, liberals and browns are going to have a lot to answer for with this level of brexit-sabotage
    Quote Originally Posted by Isyel View Post
    And btw, you're such a fucking asshole it genuinely amazes me on a regular basis how you manage to function.

  18. #14338

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    Tories implementing an old person tax and nationalising social care

    Am I actually awake

  19. #14339
    NoirAvlaa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmicker View Post
    Tories implementing an old person tax and nationalising social care

    Am I actually awake
    They've been trying their hardest to lose power since Brexit to no avail. Now it's time for the big guns!
    Quote Originally Posted by Djan Seriy Anaplian View Post
    Also that didn't sound like abloo bloo to me, PM me and we can agree on a meeting spot and settle this with queensberry rules, that's a serious offer btw. I've been a member of this community since 2005 and i've never met a more toxic individual.

  20. #14340

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    Quote Originally Posted by NoirAvlaa View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by elmicker View Post
    Tories implementing an old person tax and nationalising social care

    Am I actually awake
    They've been trying their hardest to lose power since Brexit to no avail. Now it's time for the big guns!
    they're going to have to end the pensions triple lock later this year as well because of covid bounce-back fuckery

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