hate these ads?, log in or register to hide them
Page 179 of 182 FirstFirst ... 79129169176177178179180181182 LastLast
Results 3,561 to 3,580 of 3623

Thread: (Germany über alles) Superior EU Politics Thread

  1. #3561
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Location
    in front of the class
    Posts
    15,857
    Yeh. I had offers to pursue a phd in either English lit or US history. But I was done with uni and wasn't looking forward to being paid little to nothing. Also not every phd includes a teaching position as well. You can also just spend three years doing research.
    nevar forget

  2. #3562

    Join Date
    March 10, 2019
    Posts
    377
    Thanks for chiming in guys. Clearly, we have a serious problem in the US. I am not sure how to begin to resolve it at my university but we'll see. The technological 'solutions' we use now are basically attempted solutions to problems that should not have existed in the first place. All that said, there may be parts of the US system that is better. For example, I am a little surprised at the lack of assessment. A typical math course of mine has around 14 written quizzes, 6 written worksheets, 20 online homework, 3 written exams, and a final exam.

    Quote Originally Posted by Djan Seriy Anaplian View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Euros, I need your help (really).

    I find myself in a seemingly paradoxical situation regarding current conventions in university-level math education and am forced to ask: how does a typical Calculus class at an European university proceed?

    Currently, the convention for all lower-divisional math classes, like Precalulus and Calculus I-II-III, in America in virtually every state school (?) is for students to do homework online through an (usually paid) educational provider, where this homework is automatically graded by the computer system. This is coupled with several exams during the course, culminating into a final exam at the end of the semester. The cost of the educational provider is usually absurdly expensive for the student, around $160. The typical class-size is around 30 students.

    At my university, we are now looking for alternatives to this expensive model, like WebWork and open-source textbooks, which will be free to students.

    Here is the paradox.

    I am told European colleges often have hundreds of students per class. Yet, while searching for alternatives, I have seen zero evidence of educational innovation from Europeans. No analogues of computer-based grading like WebWork, no adapative AI learning like Khan Academy, Knewton, ALEKS, and neither do there seem to be analogues of OpenStax.

    What in the world are you guys doing? How are you managing these hundreds of students per class? Have your textbooks always been free? How do you get the shit from hundreds of students graded? For me, grading the homework of even just 30 students over 3 classes is a very time-consuming task.
    Lectures are coupled with tutorial groups.
    Work is set through a tutorial group of no more than ten students - discussion on lecture material also takes place in tutorial groups.
    These tutorial groups are run by whom? This sounds like you use TAs to run these groups, are they graduate students?


    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Euros, I need your help (really).

    I find myself in a seemingly paradoxical situation regarding current conventions in university-level math education and am forced to ask: how does a typical Calculus class at an European university proceed?

    Currently, the convention for all lower-divisional math classes, like Precalulus and Calculus I-II-III, in America in virtually every state school (?) is for students to do homework online through an (usually paid) educational provider, where this homework is automatically graded by the computer system. This is coupled with several exams during the course, culminating into a final exam at the end of the semester. The cost of the educational provider is usually absurdly expensive for the student, around $160. The typical class-size is around 30 students.

    At my university, we are now looking for alternatives to this expensive model, like WebWork and open-source textbooks, which will be free to students.

    Here is the paradox.

    I am told European colleges often have hundreds of students per class. Yet, while searching for alternatives, I have seen zero evidence of educational innovation from Europeans. No analogues of computer-based grading like WebWork, no adapative AI learning like Khan Academy, Knewton, ALEKS, and neither do there seem to be analogues of OpenStax.

    What in the world are you guys doing? How are you managing these hundreds of students per class? Have your textbooks always been free? How do you get the shit from hundreds of students graded? For me, grading the homework of even just 30 students over 3 classes is a very time-consuming task.
    for me, it was 3 hour sessions, 1h 20 minutes lecture, 1h 20 minutes problems in groups (4-10 people), textbooks are for prep for the lecture and reference. the 20 minutes usually divided up into breaks during lectures.

    during the problem solving groups are expected to help each other out as best as they can with lecturer and assistant prof's going from group to group to help with the problems as required, problems are specifically selected to be relevant to the lecture, and range in difficulty, usually we could do about half without assistance and i would often take home problems and solve in my spare time.

    running evaluations where 2 a semester, consisting of a assignment set covering recent lecture material, rarely more than 3 pages, as well as a mock exam, usually using last year's set, the month before exams that would make it painfully obvious how inadequate you where.
    I see. Thanks for chiming in with your experience. So this method seems like you did not really have 'homework' per se, but more like you did problems in class and if you didn't finish it, you would do it at home. And the lecturers and assistant professors would grade this themselves? Did you use an English-language textbook, and equally important, did you actually bother to read it? Here in the US, we have a big problem where students do not read the textbooks, but they can hardly be blamed for this since commercial textbooks are bloated garbage. I wouldn't read them, myself!

    Quote Originally Posted by depili View Post
    Yeah, there are no paid platforms and usually it is expected for the lecturer to provide enough materials to pass the course, books are optional extral. Olden days you got stacks of photo copies from the university for nominal fees (euro or two per course), nowadays its usually a stack of pdfs. This being on a technical university, law, medical etc need more books, but then again it is expected for the university libraries to provide copies
    Interesting. Here in the US, our libraries will carry copies of textbooks but it is usually a maximum of three or four physical copies of a book. And there will be dozens if not hundreds of students who need this textbook. Thus, as a student, I bought all my textbooks for every course, and so did most other people. In the US, it is a violation of copyright rules to provide a pdf of a textbook, unless the publisher explicitly allows this, so we are barred from doing that.

    You were not assigned homework from a book? Usually, if homework is not done online, then the homework consists of "do problems #1-10 from the book".
    Last edited by August; November 7 2020 at 04:31:46 AM.

  3. #3563

    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Location
    Pizza delivery van
    Posts
    7,824
    All of the excercise problems are graded, but tests (even more standardised tests) don't really teach people anything other than taking tests. We rather have people actually learning than sitting in exams. Also our courses are probably smaller units than yours.

    TAs run the excercise groups. And no, the problems aren't usually from the books, they are devised by the lecturers as the ones in the books are generally just quite horrible from the learning point of view (and any moron can get the answers online if he wants, thus they tell nothing)
    Last edited by depili; November 7 2020 at 07:25:30 AM.

  4. #3564
    Djan Seriy Anaplian's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    5,285
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Thanks for chiming in guys. Clearly, we have a serious problem in the US. I am not sure how to begin to resolve it at my university but we'll see. The technological 'solutions' we use now are basically attempted solutions to problems that should not have existed in the first place. All that said, there may be parts of the US system that is better. For example, I am a little surprised at the lack of assessment. A typical math course of mine has around 14 written quizzes, 6 written worksheets, 20 online homework, 3 written exams, and a final exam.

    Quote Originally Posted by Djan Seriy Anaplian View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Euros, I need your help (really).

    I find myself in a seemingly paradoxical situation regarding current conventions in university-level math education and am forced to ask: how does a typical Calculus class at an European university proceed?

    Currently, the convention for all lower-divisional math classes, like Precalulus and Calculus I-II-III, in America in virtually every state school (?) is for students to do homework online through an (usually paid) educational provider, where this homework is automatically graded by the computer system. This is coupled with several exams during the course, culminating into a final exam at the end of the semester. The cost of the educational provider is usually absurdly expensive for the student, around $160. The typical class-size is around 30 students.

    At my university, we are now looking for alternatives to this expensive model, like WebWork and open-source textbooks, which will be free to students.

    Here is the paradox.

    I am told European colleges often have hundreds of students per class. Yet, while searching for alternatives, I have seen zero evidence of educational innovation from Europeans. No analogues of computer-based grading like WebWork, no adapative AI learning like Khan Academy, Knewton, ALEKS, and neither do there seem to be analogues of OpenStax.

    What in the world are you guys doing? How are you managing these hundreds of students per class? Have your textbooks always been free? How do you get the shit from hundreds of students graded? For me, grading the homework of even just 30 students over 3 classes is a very time-consuming task.
    Lectures are coupled with tutorial groups.
    Work is set through a tutorial group of no more than ten students - discussion on lecture material also takes place in tutorial groups.
    These tutorial groups are run by whom? This sounds like you use TAs to run these groups, are they graduate students?


    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Euros, I need your help (really).

    I find myself in a seemingly paradoxical situation regarding current conventions in university-level math education and am forced to ask: how does a typical Calculus class at an European university proceed?

    Currently, the convention for all lower-divisional math classes, like Precalulus and Calculus I-II-III, in America in virtually every state school (?) is for students to do homework online through an (usually paid) educational provider, where this homework is automatically graded by the computer system. This is coupled with several exams during the course, culminating into a final exam at the end of the semester. The cost of the educational provider is usually absurdly expensive for the student, around $160. The typical class-size is around 30 students.

    At my university, we are now looking for alternatives to this expensive model, like WebWork and open-source textbooks, which will be free to students.

    Here is the paradox.

    I am told European colleges often have hundreds of students per class. Yet, while searching for alternatives, I have seen zero evidence of educational innovation from Europeans. No analogues of computer-based grading like WebWork, no adapative AI learning like Khan Academy, Knewton, ALEKS, and neither do there seem to be analogues of OpenStax.

    What in the world are you guys doing? How are you managing these hundreds of students per class? Have your textbooks always been free? How do you get the shit from hundreds of students graded? For me, grading the homework of even just 30 students over 3 classes is a very time-consuming task.
    for me, it was 3 hour sessions, 1h 20 minutes lecture, 1h 20 minutes problems in groups (4-10 people), textbooks are for prep for the lecture and reference. the 20 minutes usually divided up into breaks during lectures.

    during the problem solving groups are expected to help each other out as best as they can with lecturer and assistant prof's going from group to group to help with the problems as required, problems are specifically selected to be relevant to the lecture, and range in difficulty, usually we could do about half without assistance and i would often take home problems and solve in my spare time.

    running evaluations where 2 a semester, consisting of a assignment set covering recent lecture material, rarely more than 3 pages, as well as a mock exam, usually using last year's set, the month before exams that would make it painfully obvious how inadequate you where.
    I see. Thanks for chiming in with your experience. So this method seems like you did not really have 'homework' per se, but more like you did problems in class and if you didn't finish it, you would do it at home. And the lecturers and assistant professors would grade this themselves? Did you use an English-language textbook, and equally important, did you actually bother to read it? Here in the US, we have a big problem where students do not read the textbooks, but they can hardly be blamed for this since commercial textbooks are bloated garbage. I wouldn't read them, myself!

    Quote Originally Posted by depili View Post
    Yeah, there are no paid platforms and usually it is expected for the lecturer to provide enough materials to pass the course, books are optional extral. Olden days you got stacks of photo copies from the university for nominal fees (euro or two per course), nowadays its usually a stack of pdfs. This being on a technical university, law, medical etc need more books, but then again it is expected for the university libraries to provide copies
    Interesting. Here in the US, our libraries will carry copies of textbooks but it is usually a maximum of three or four physical copies of a book. And there will be dozens if not hundreds of students who need this textbook. Thus, as a student, I bought all my textbooks for every course, and so did most other people. In the US, it is a violation of copyright rules to provide a pdf of a textbook, unless the publisher explicitly allows this, so we are barred from doing that.

    You were not assigned homework from a book? Usually, if homework is not done online, then the homework consists of "do problems #1-10 from the book".
    For me the lecturers ran 9/10 tutorial groups, with some PhDs for the others mate. PhDs were definitely more prevalent in pure humanities like English/History etc because it’s not really necessary for a lecturer to get so hands on. But for my subject (law), they were almost all lecturers.

    edit: one thing I would say is that is your experience possibly the result of the major/minor system? Universities outside the US don’t run that way and students turn up expecting to specialise immediately, so there’s a lot more buy-in with regard to engaging with course materials etc.
    Last edited by Djan Seriy Anaplian; November 7 2020 at 08:44:24 AM.

  5. #3565
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Location
    in front of the class
    Posts
    15,857
    Grading at German unis happens at the end of the semester in a final exam most of the time.

    You're an adult, it's your responsibility to get shit done.

    Tapapapatalk
    nevar forget

  6. #3566
    מלך יהודים Zeekar's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Posts
    15,578
    Grading homework


    

  7. #3567
    evil edna's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Posts
    5,913
    Burger unis seem more like an extension of high school

  8. #3568
    Keckers's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 31, 2012
    Posts
    22,500
    Well they are primarily learning to dodge bullets in high school so they have some catching up to do by the time they get to uni.
    Look, the wages you withheld from the workmen who mowed your fields are crying out against you. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of Hosts. You have lived on earth in luxury and self-indulgence. You have fattened yourselves for slaughter.

  9. #3569

    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Posts
    4,706
    Ive had graded exercises (and lab courses) that made up 50% of the course credits; admittedly, in a technical field so maybe the experience was different.

    Attendance, on the other hand, is entirely voluntary. If you think you can absorb the material on your own, noone is going to swaddle you. You are free to fail on your own.

  10. #3570

    Join Date
    March 10, 2019
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by evil edna View Post
    Burger unis seem more like an extension of high school
    At schools which aren't good schools (the top 10-20%), yes the first two years aren't necessarily so different from high school. After that, students should be done with their general studies and the higher division courses rarely operate in the way I describe.
    Last edited by August; November 7 2020 at 07:02:07 PM.

  11. #3571
    dzajic's Avatar
    Join Date
    June 15, 2011
    Posts
    3,863
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    Grading at German unis happens at the end of the semester in a final exam most of the time.

    You're an adult, it's your responsibility to get shit done.

    Tapapapatalk
    What, shouldn't all of EU be on Blognone Declaration with uni courses chopped into tiny pieces with zillion semestral papers and mini exams?

  12. #3572
    Liare's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    14,972
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    I see. Thanks for chiming in with your experience. So this method seems like you did not really have 'homework' per se, but more like you did problems in class and if you didn't finish it, you would do it at home. And the lecturers and assistant professors would grade this themselves? Did you use an English-language textbook, and equally important, did you actually bother to read it? Here in the US, we have a big problem where students do not read the textbooks, but they can hardly be blamed for this since commercial textbooks are bloated garbage. I wouldn't read them, myself!
    they didn't grade it, we where provided solutions the next lecture to compare and where encouraged to discuss it if we didn't grasp the particulars, indeed often the more complex problems would be discussed and explained at the start of the lecture. it's not school, they're not there to ram knowledge down our throats, learning is your own responsibility.

    the exam is there to verify you did indeed learn things, and structured into discrete portions that test particular knowledge and skills. we where encouraged to provide feedback on lectures and usually at least one session would be dedicated to repetition of difficult subjects, chosen by the class.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  13. #3573
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Location
    in front of the class
    Posts
    15,857
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by evil edna View Post
    Burger unis seem more like an extension of high school
    At schools which aren't good schools (the top 10-20%), yes the first two years aren't necessarily so different from high school. After that, students should be done with their general studies and the higher division courses rarely operate in the way I describe.
    You shouldn't need to do any general studies at uni.
    Quote Originally Posted by dzajic View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    Grading at German unis happens at the end of the semester in a final exam most of the time.

    You're an adult, it's your responsibility to get shit done.

    Tapapapatalk
    What, shouldn't all of EU be on Blognone Declaration with uni courses chopped into tiny pieces with zillion semestral papers and mini exams?
    I studied during the Bologna Process and along with our professors made sure that it would not destroy the way our uni and by extension German unis work.

    Tapapapatalk
    nevar forget

  14. #3574
    Liare's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    14,972
    EU legislation is not decrees from god, it's a set of guidelines to make national legislation under.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  15. #3575

    Join Date
    March 10, 2019
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    I see. Thanks for chiming in with your experience. So this method seems like you did not really have 'homework' per se, but more like you did problems in class and if you didn't finish it, you would do it at home. And the lecturers and assistant professors would grade this themselves? Did you use an English-language textbook, and equally important, did you actually bother to read it? Here in the US, we have a big problem where students do not read the textbooks, but they can hardly be blamed for this since commercial textbooks are bloated garbage. I wouldn't read them, myself!
    they didn't grade it, we where provided solutions the next lecture to compare and where encouraged to discuss it if we didn't grasp the particulars, indeed often the more complex problems would be discussed and explained at the start of the lecture. it's not school, they're not there to ram knowledge down our throats, learning is your own responsibility.

    the exam is there to verify you did indeed learn things, and structured into discrete portions that test particular knowledge and skills. we where encouraged to provide feedback on lectures and usually at least one session would be dedicated to repetition of difficult subjects, chosen by the class.
    Did you use English-language textbooks and did you read them? Through the miracle of sites of questionable legality, I'm looking into Singapore's materials at their universities for the Calculus series and I'm shocked to find that they use the same 800-page textbooks that we do in America. However, they have superb 'study guides' that are around 200 pages long, and it's plausible to me that most of their students read that rather than the textbook.

  16. #3576
    Kai's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 2, 2012
    Posts
    7,482
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    I see. Thanks for chiming in with your experience. So this method seems like you did not really have 'homework' per se, but more like you did problems in class and if you didn't finish it, you would do it at home. And the lecturers and assistant professors would grade this themselves? Did you use an English-language textbook, and equally important, did you actually bother to read it? Here in the US, we have a big problem where students do not read the textbooks, but they can hardly be blamed for this since commercial textbooks are bloated garbage. I wouldn't read them, myself!
    they didn't grade it, we where provided solutions the next lecture to compare and where encouraged to discuss it if we didn't grasp the particulars, indeed often the more complex problems would be discussed and explained at the start of the lecture. it's not school, they're not there to ram knowledge down our throats, learning is your own responsibility.

    the exam is there to verify you did indeed learn things, and structured into discrete portions that test particular knowledge and skills. we where encouraged to provide feedback on lectures and usually at least one session would be dedicated to repetition of difficult subjects, chosen by the class.
    Did you use English-language textbooks and did you read them? Through the miracle of sites of questionable legality, I'm looking into Singapore's materials at their universities for the Calculus series and I'm shocked to find that they use the same 800-page textbooks that we do in America. However, they have superb 'study guides' that are around 200 pages long, and it's plausible to me that most of their students read that rather than the textbook.
    They're Singaporean students. They read both the text book and the study guide if the ones I went to uni with are any indication.

  17. #3577
    Liare's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    14,972
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    I see. Thanks for chiming in with your experience. So this method seems like you did not really have 'homework' per se, but more like you did problems in class and if you didn't finish it, you would do it at home. And the lecturers and assistant professors would grade this themselves? Did you use an English-language textbook, and equally important, did you actually bother to read it? Here in the US, we have a big problem where students do not read the textbooks, but they can hardly be blamed for this since commercial textbooks are bloated garbage. I wouldn't read them, myself!
    they didn't grade it, we where provided solutions the next lecture to compare and where encouraged to discuss it if we didn't grasp the particulars, indeed often the more complex problems would be discussed and explained at the start of the lecture. it's not school, they're not there to ram knowledge down our throats, learning is your own responsibility.

    the exam is there to verify you did indeed learn things, and structured into discrete portions that test particular knowledge and skills. we where encouraged to provide feedback on lectures and usually at least one session would be dedicated to repetition of difficult subjects, chosen by the class.
    Did you use English-language textbooks and did you read them? Through the miracle of sites of questionable legality, I'm looking into Singapore's materials at their universities for the Calculus series and I'm shocked to find that they use the same 800-page textbooks that we do in America. However, they have superb 'study guides' that are around 200 pages long, and it's plausible to me that most of their students read that rather than the textbook.
    some of it was english, some danish, and even a bit of german. i usually read parts of them, the lecturer would provide what chapters where relevant, or rather what elements of what chapters where relevant and usually hand out material as needed.

    things where rarely off a single textbook, often it would be a set of chapters from one, then a bit from another and so forth, we'd be expected to have the main book, with the rest provided as course material. the books where a supplement to lectures and i most often found them useful after, rather than before the lectures themselves.

    its a way to work around the overly verbose and test-centric english language books, maybe a third of a given volume would be useful.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  18. #3578
    dzajic's Avatar
    Join Date
    June 15, 2011
    Posts
    3,863
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    EU legislation is not decrees from god, it's a set of guidelines to make national legislation under.
    Well Serbia is not in EU and Bologne declaration was presented as a absolute word of God that must be respected. What, Milošević was ousted in 2000 and by 2005 all universites were fully Bologne.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

  19. #3579
    Caldrion Dosto's Avatar
    Join Date
    November 19, 2011
    Posts
    2,663
    Quote Originally Posted by dzajic View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    EU legislation is not decrees from god, it's a set of guidelines to make national legislation under.
    Well Serbia is not in EU and Bologne declaration was presented as a absolute word of God that must be respected. What, Milošević was ousted in 2000 and by 2005 all universites were fully Bologne.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    Might have something to do with a desire to join the club rather then listen to "God" for the sake of it?

  20. #3580

    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Location
    Pizza delivery van
    Posts
    7,824
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by August View Post
    I see. Thanks for chiming in with your experience. So this method seems like you did not really have 'homework' per se, but more like you did problems in class and if you didn't finish it, you would do it at home. And the lecturers and assistant professors would grade this themselves? Did you use an English-language textbook, and equally important, did you actually bother to read it? Here in the US, we have a big problem where students do not read the textbooks, but they can hardly be blamed for this since commercial textbooks are bloated garbage. I wouldn't read them, myself!
    they didn't grade it, we where provided solutions the next lecture to compare and where encouraged to discuss it if we didn't grasp the particulars, indeed often the more complex problems would be discussed and explained at the start of the lecture. it's not school, they're not there to ram knowledge down our throats, learning is your own responsibility.

    the exam is there to verify you did indeed learn things, and structured into discrete portions that test particular knowledge and skills. we where encouraged to provide feedback on lectures and usually at least one session would be dedicated to repetition of difficult subjects, chosen by the class.
    Did you use English-language textbooks and did you read them? Through the miracle of sites of questionable legality, I'm looking into Singapore's materials at their universities for the Calculus series and I'm shocked to find that they use the same 800-page textbooks that we do in America. However, they have superb 'study guides' that are around 200 pages long, and it's plausible to me that most of their students read that rather than the textbook.
    some of it was english, some danish, and even a bit of german. i usually read parts of them, the lecturer would provide what chapters where relevant, or rather what elements of what chapters where relevant and usually hand out material as needed.

    things where rarely off a single textbook, often it would be a set of chapters from one, then a bit from another and so forth, we'd be expected to have the main book, with the rest provided as course material. the books where a supplement to lectures and i most often found them useful after, rather than before the lectures themselves.

    its a way to work around the overly verbose and test-centric english language books, maybe a third of a given volume would be useful.
    I think as a freshman I bought 4ish english books for uni as I tought I would need them, didn't buy any after that as they were useless paperweights. Bought some focused finnish books later, mostly made by the university press. The american books are just a lost cause with little nuggets of information hidden in a rambling prose for 20 pages. Completely useless as references

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •