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Thread: PLAGUE: Not even Best Korea is safe

  1. #4521
    Movember 2012 Elriche Oshego's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hel OWeen View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lief Siddhe View Post
    We Slavs have a history of drinking in parks and anywhere basically, but Austrians and Germans actually amazed me. People literally walk the streets with beercans in their hands on the way to town or home from work. We at least have the common decency to sit down or stop and talk somewhere to get drunk.
    That might be the difference. For the most part, it's just that: one beer on the way from work to home. There's no intention to get drunk, just a refreshing beverage.

  2. #4522
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lief Siddhe View Post
    We Slavs have a history of drinking in parks and anywhere basically, but Austrians and Germans actually amazed me. People literally walk the streets with beercans in their hands on the way to town or home from work. We at least have the common decency to sit down or stop and talk somewhere to get drunk.
    I have read this post three times now and still fail to see the problem. Why else would you buy a can?
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?
    Quote Originally Posted by NotXenosis View Post

    M8, i have discussions that spam multiple accounts, you aren't even on my level

  3. #4523
    Donor erichkknaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lief Siddhe View Post
    We Slavs have a history of drinking in parks and anywhere basically, but Austrians and Germans actually amazed me. People literally walk the streets with beercans in their hands on the way to town or home from work. We at least have the common decency to sit down or stop and talk somewhere to get drunk.
    I have read this post three times now and still fail to see the problem. Why else would you buy a can?
    To drink Ottarkringer while the U-Bahn takes you to the Ottarkring, ofc.
    meh

  4. #4524

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Coutu View Post
    Quick detour for all the non U.S members here, does anyone live in a country were soliders are so feitshized by the populace as they are here?
    Considering most men in my generation have done their military service due to conscription, no. There has been efforts in recent years to a more appreciative view as they've had problems with recruitment but since we're starting up our conscription again I suspect that will fizzle out.

    Which is a good thing overall. Glorifying the military is asking for trouble.

  5. #4525
    Lief Siddhe's Avatar
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    You buy a can and then sit down in the park, pop it open and chat about genocide while drinking, like a civilized Slav. You don't walk around drinking beer, unless you're an alcoholic or a German.
    I was somewhere around Old Man Star, on the edge of Essence, when drugs began to take hold.

  6. #4526
    Movember 2012 Stoffl's Avatar
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    Obvious lack of efficiency ~

    MI8m8

  7. #4527
    dzajic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hel OWeen View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lief Siddhe View Post
    We Slavs have a history of drinking in parks and anywhere basically, but Austrians and Germans actually amazed me. People literally walk the streets with beercans in their hands on the way to town or home from work. We at least have the common decency to sit down or stop and talk somewhere to get drunk.
    That might be the difference. For the most part, it's just that: one beer on the way from work to home. There's no intention to get drunk, just a refreshing beverage.
    I know you Germans, you talk about "one beer" and you invent the Maß

  8. #4528
    Jack Coutu's Avatar
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    Slav...

    Civilizied...

    Does not compute.

  9. #4529
    Idara's Avatar
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    Our local medical health unit head is against mandating masks. Got in a Twitter fight with some people asking why and he compared mandatory masks to involuntary circumcision. Deleted the tweets afterwards, but hey, the internet and everything:


  10. #4530
    evil edna's Avatar
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    This is why twitter is great

  11. #4531

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    Twatter, not even once.

  12. #4532
    GeromeDoutrande's Avatar
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    An mRNA Vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 — Preliminary Report
    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.105...=featured_home

    Moderna vaccine produces antibodies in early trial
    https://www.ft.com/content/1457f1b8-...a-89578283dae1

    Moderna’s potential Covid-19 vaccine produced immune responses in patients in the early stage trial, according to results published in a peer-reviewed journal for the first time.*The US biotech company’s vaccine candidate produced antibodies in all 45 participants in the first cohort of the phase one trial run by the National Institutes of Health, while the paper said there were no safety problems that could curtail further trials.*

    In the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors from academic medical centers in Seattle and Atlanta said the findings support further development of the vaccine. These preliminary results support the initial data that Moderna released in May from the first eight patients.*Tal Zaks, chief medical officer at Moderna, said the vaccine candidate — known as mRNA-1273 — elicits a “robust immune response across all dose levels”.* “We look forward to beginning our Phase three study of mRNA-1273 this month to demonstrate our vaccine’s ability to significantly reduce the risk of Covid-19 disease,” he said.*

    Moderna was the first US company to test its potential vaccine in humans, sending the vials to the NIH just 42 days after it received the genome of Covid-19. It has received $483m in funding from the US Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency to speed up the development of the vaccine. The biotech group uses a new technique, based on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), which transcribes some of the virus’s genetic code into human cells to teach the immune system to detect the invader. Other companies including Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech are also using this method, but a vaccine based on mRNA has yet to be approved in the US.*

    The trial showed that 15 days after the first dose, all participants had produced antibodies. After 57 days, the participants had on average more antibodies than a group of 38 recovered patients, whose symptoms were mainly mild or moderate. There are large variations in the levels of antibodies seen in recovered patients and, as yet, no standard for which to compare a vaccine. There was also evidence of some response from T-cells, another important part of the immune system.*

    More than half of the participants experienced side effects including fatigue, chills, headaches and muscle pains. The adverse effects became worse after the second injection. More than 20 per cent of those taking the highest dose reported one or more severe adverse effects but the coming trial intends to use a significantly lower dose.* Andrew Freedman, a reader in infectious diseases at the University of Cardiff, read the abstract before it was released and said a full report would be needed before “firm conclusions” could be reached. But he added the adverse events were quite common after other vaccinations.*“It does suggest that this novel vaccine, using messenger RNA rather than protein, is able to stimulate antibody production in a dose-dependent fashion,” he said in a statement. “Importantly, the antibodies generated were able to neutralise the virus in laboratory assays.”

  13. #4533
    dzajic's Avatar
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    Fingers motherfucking crossed and praying to God. No atheists in foxholes or deadly pandemics.

  14. #4534

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeromeDoutrande View Post
    An mRNA Vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 — Preliminary Report
    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.105...=featured_home

    Moderna vaccine produces antibodies in early trial
    https://www.ft.com/content/1457f1b8-...a-89578283dae1

    Moderna’s potential Covid-19 vaccine produced immune responses in patients in the early stage trial, according to results published in a peer-reviewed journal for the first time.*The US biotech company’s vaccine candidate produced antibodies in all 45 participants in the first cohort of the phase one trial run by the National Institutes of Health, while the paper said there were no safety problems that could curtail further trials.*

    In the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors from academic medical centers in Seattle and Atlanta said the findings support further development of the vaccine. These preliminary results support the initial data that Moderna released in May from the first eight patients.*Tal Zaks, chief medical officer at Moderna, said the vaccine candidate — known as mRNA-1273 — elicits a “robust immune response across all dose levels”.* “We look forward to beginning our Phase three study of mRNA-1273 this month to demonstrate our vaccine’s ability to significantly reduce the risk of Covid-19 disease,” he said.*

    Moderna was the first US company to test its potential vaccine in humans, sending the vials to the NIH just 42 days after it received the genome of Covid-19. It has received $483m in funding from the US Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency to speed up the development of the vaccine. The biotech group uses a new technique, based on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), which transcribes some of the virus’s genetic code into human cells to teach the immune system to detect the invader. Other companies including Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech are also using this method, but a vaccine based on mRNA has yet to be approved in the US.*

    The trial showed that 15 days after the first dose, all participants had produced antibodies. After 57 days, the participants had on average more antibodies than a group of 38 recovered patients, whose symptoms were mainly mild or moderate. There are large variations in the levels of antibodies seen in recovered patients and, as yet, no standard for which to compare a vaccine. There was also evidence of some response from T-cells, another important part of the immune system.*

    More than half of the participants experienced side effects including fatigue, chills, headaches and muscle pains. The adverse effects became worse after the second injection. More than 20 per cent of those taking the highest dose reported one or more severe adverse effects but the coming trial intends to use a significantly lower dose.* Andrew Freedman, a reader in infectious diseases at the University of Cardiff, read the abstract before it was released and said a full report would be needed before “firm conclusions” could be reached. But he added the adverse events were quite common after other vaccinations.*“It does suggest that this novel vaccine, using messenger RNA rather than protein, is able to stimulate antibody production in a dose-dependent fashion,” he said in a statement. “Importantly, the antibodies generated were able to neutralise the virus in laboratory assays.”
    This is quite big news in its own right, regardless of if this specific vaccine is borne out to conclusion. No one's ever done an mRNA vaccine before - this is an entirely new technique and in principle they're easier to manufacture.

    However there are other, more traditional vaccines, further along now. The Gruain are maintaining a tracker of which candidate is at which stage.

  15. #4535
    Super Chillerator Global Moderator teds :D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmicker View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GeromeDoutrande View Post
    An mRNA Vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 — Preliminary Report
    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.105...=featured_home

    Moderna vaccine produces antibodies in early trial
    https://www.ft.com/content/1457f1b8-...a-89578283dae1

    Moderna’s potential Covid-19 vaccine produced immune responses in patients in the early stage trial, according to results published in a peer-reviewed journal for the first time.*The US biotech company’s vaccine candidate produced antibodies in all 45 participants in the first cohort of the phase one trial run by the National Institutes of Health, while the paper said there were no safety problems that could curtail further trials.*

    In the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors from academic medical centers in Seattle and Atlanta said the findings support further development of the vaccine. These preliminary results support the initial data that Moderna released in May from the first eight patients.*Tal Zaks, chief medical officer at Moderna, said the vaccine candidate — known as mRNA-1273 — elicits a “robust immune response across all dose levels”.* “We look forward to beginning our Phase three study of mRNA-1273 this month to demonstrate our vaccine’s ability to significantly reduce the risk of Covid-19 disease,” he said.*

    Moderna was the first US company to test its potential vaccine in humans, sending the vials to the NIH just 42 days after it received the genome of Covid-19. It has received $483m in funding from the US Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency to speed up the development of the vaccine. The biotech group uses a new technique, based on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), which transcribes some of the virus’s genetic code into human cells to teach the immune system to detect the invader. Other companies including Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech are also using this method, but a vaccine based on mRNA has yet to be approved in the US.*

    The trial showed that 15 days after the first dose, all participants had produced antibodies. After 57 days, the participants had on average more antibodies than a group of 38 recovered patients, whose symptoms were mainly mild or moderate. There are large variations in the levels of antibodies seen in recovered patients and, as yet, no standard for which to compare a vaccine. There was also evidence of some response from T-cells, another important part of the immune system.*

    More than half of the participants experienced side effects including fatigue, chills, headaches and muscle pains. The adverse effects became worse after the second injection. More than 20 per cent of those taking the highest dose reported one or more severe adverse effects but the coming trial intends to use a significantly lower dose.* Andrew Freedman, a reader in infectious diseases at the University of Cardiff, read the abstract before it was released and said a full report would be needed before “firm conclusions” could be reached. But he added the adverse events were quite common after other vaccinations.*“It does suggest that this novel vaccine, using messenger RNA rather than protein, is able to stimulate antibody production in a dose-dependent fashion,” he said in a statement. “Importantly, the antibodies generated were able to neutralise the virus in laboratory assays.”
    This is quite big news in its own right, regardless of if this specific vaccine is borne out to conclusion. No one's ever done an mRNA vaccine before - this is an entirely new technique and in principle they're easier to manufacture.

    However there are other, more traditional vaccines, further along now. The Gruain are maintaining a tracker of which candidate is at which stage.
    going of that the AZ vaccine looks pretty far ahead - but boris has mentioned a few times recently that a vaccine may never be found... what do you make of that?

  16. #4536
    evil edna's Avatar
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    are boris nows best

  17. #4537

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    Quote Originally Posted by teds :D View Post
    going of that the AZ vaccine looks pretty far ahead - but boris has mentioned a few times recently that a vaccine may never be found... what do you make of that?
    He's not wrong. The big, big elephant in the room at the minute is that while we know that several vaccine candidates result in antibodies being produced, we don't really know what that means in practical terms. There's a number of things we need to understand, such as how many antibodies you need to be protected, whether that protection protects you from symptoms/protects you from getting it/protects you from spreading it etc, how long that protection lasts, whether it can be boosted, whether it just goes away over time and/or whether the virus adapts and so on. In addition there's some purely practical items like understanding if vaccines produced en masse are produced safely and consistently - the production methods used for later stages may well be radically different from the small-scale lab production done for stage 1 + 2.

    That's why it's so encouraging to see candidate vaccines coming from many paths. It's likely the only way we can crank out the many billions of doses needed is through diverse manufacturing techniques, and likewise it's likely we'll at least initially need some combination of vaccines to get the levels of coverage and protection we need.

  18. #4538

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmicker View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by teds :D View Post
    going of that the AZ vaccine looks pretty far ahead - but boris has mentioned a few times recently that a vaccine may never be found... what do you make of that?
    He's not wrong. The big, big elephant in the room at the minute is that while we know that several vaccine candidates result in antibodies being produced, we don't really know what that means in practical terms. There's a number of things we need to understand, such as how many antibodies you need to be protected, whether that protection protects you from symptoms/protects you from getting it/protects you from spreading it etc, how long that protection lasts, whether it can be boosted, whether it just goes away over time and/or whether the virus adapts and so on. In addition there's some purely practical items like understanding if vaccines produced en masse are produced safely and consistently - the production methods used for later stages may well be radically different from the small-scale lab production done for stage 1 + 2.

    That's why it's so encouraging to see candidate vaccines coming from many paths. It's likely the only way we can crank out the many billions of doses needed is through diverse manufacturing techniques, and likewise it's likely we'll at least initially need some combination of vaccines to get the levels of coverage and protection we need.
    Has anyone worked out a solution to the anti-vaxer problem yet?

  19. #4539
    Ski Boot Fortior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by elmicker View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by teds :D View Post
    going of that the AZ vaccine looks pretty far ahead - but boris has mentioned a few times recently that a vaccine may never be found... what do you make of that?
    He's not wrong. The big, big elephant in the room at the minute is that while we know that several vaccine candidates result in antibodies being produced, we don't really know what that means in practical terms. There's a number of things we need to understand, such as how many antibodies you need to be protected, whether that protection protects you from symptoms/protects you from getting it/protects you from spreading it etc, how long that protection lasts, whether it can be boosted, whether it just goes away over time and/or whether the virus adapts and so on. In addition there's some purely practical items like understanding if vaccines produced en masse are produced safely and consistently - the production methods used for later stages may well be radically different from the small-scale lab production done for stage 1 + 2.

    That's why it's so encouraging to see candidate vaccines coming from many paths. It's likely the only way we can crank out the many billions of doses needed is through diverse manufacturing techniques, and likewise it's likely we'll at least initially need some combination of vaccines to get the levels of coverage and protection we need.
    Has anyone worked out a solution to the anti-vaxer problem yet?
    I’d say the surrounding circumstances and nature would provide a final solution, given enough time.
    Real men pvp in barges.

    Quote Originally Posted by Amantus View Post
    good to see that Fortior seems like a decent bloke and isn't a gay fat faggot nerd despite his pony avatar

  20. #4540
    Movember 2011Movember 2012 Nordstern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by elmicker View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by teds :D View Post
    going of that the AZ vaccine looks pretty far ahead - but boris has mentioned a few times recently that a vaccine may never be found... what do you make of that?
    He's not wrong. The big, big elephant in the room at the minute is that while we know that several vaccine candidates result in antibodies being produced, we don't really know what that means in practical terms. There's a number of things we need to understand, such as how many antibodies you need to be protected, whether that protection protects you from symptoms/protects you from getting it/protects you from spreading it etc, how long that protection lasts, whether it can be boosted, whether it just goes away over time and/or whether the virus adapts and so on. In addition there's some purely practical items like understanding if vaccines produced en masse are produced safely and consistently - the production methods used for later stages may well be radically different from the small-scale lab production done for stage 1 + 2.

    That's why it's so encouraging to see candidate vaccines coming from many paths. It's likely the only way we can crank out the many billions of doses needed is through diverse manufacturing techniques, and likewise it's likely we'll at least initially need some combination of vaccines to get the levels of coverage and protection we need.
    Has anyone worked out a solution to the anti-vaxer problem yet?
    The next time Trump mentions vaccine progress, someone should yell "you said vaccines cause autism" so we can see how he'll react.
    "Holy shit, I ask you to stop being autistic and you debate what autistic is." - spasm
    Quote Originally Posted by Larkonis Trassler View Post
    WTF I hate white people now...
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